Many parents find that when their child sleeps is the only time that they have some peace and quiet, a little alone time. However, what happens when the children’s behavior with sleep is not what you want it to be or what it needs to be? Not only does your child not get enough rest throughout the night but you can miss out on a lot of sleep as well, making all of you frustrated, tired and extremely cranky. One or two nights of missed or disturbed sleep is one thing, but night after night of the same pattern is another. If you feel as though your children’s behavior with sleep is not what it should be, it is time to take action.

Some examples of sleep problems with your child may include waking up crying, difficulty falling to sleep, bedwetting, nightmares, waking too early, teeth grinding, and frequently waking up throughout the night. Your child may experience one, two, or several of these issues. If this is the case, then you know that you have an issue that must be addressed and taken seriously.

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Many times, the problem is separation anxiety and it is something that many children go through. For the young mind, bedtime is a major time of separation. They will kick, scream, cry and consistently wake up during the night in order to make sure that you do not live their side. To help reduce these problems, you will want to first start with setting a regular bedtime schedule. The bedtime for a child should be consistent, even on the weekends until the child is able to fall asleep easily and sleep throughout the night without problems.

Not only do you need to have a set bedtime each night, but also you want to have a set routine in place leading up to bedtime. This will help the child slowly adjust to the idea that it is bedtime instead of just throwing off the television on night and stating that it is time to go to sleep now. Have the child change into their pajamas, brush their teeth, read a book and then lay down for the night. Whatever your routine is, make sure that you follow the same routine every single night and the children’s behavior with sleep will improve.

If your child is waking up from nightmares, make sure that you are providing comfort and reassurance that the nightmares are not real and that the child is okay. Once the child begins to understand that there is nothing to be afraid of, the nightmares may no longer wake him or her up as often. In time, you should see your children’s behavior with sleep improve. If your child continues for a long period of time with the nightmares or bedwetting, make sure that you talk to your child’s doctor.

Dealing with children’s behavior with sleep can be a trying time for both the children and the parents but it is one that you can get through. Understand that this phase is normal for many children and that it will not last forever.

RyanChild Behavior
Many parents find that when their child sleeps is the only time that they have some peace and quiet, a little alone time. However, what happens when the children’s behavior with sleep is not what you want it to be or what it needs to be? Not only does...